Jul 23, 2014

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The Mind ~ Breaking the Vicious Cycle of our ‘Thinking’ ~ Alan Watts

The Mind ~ Breaking the Vicious Cycle of our ‘Thinking’ ~ Alan Watts

alan wattspix1The Mind – Alan Watts  ~ Oftentimes… when navigating through the veils of duality, we can find ourselves being hunted by our internal dialogue… by our incessant thinking. We can become so invested in our ‘stories’ that we start to feel that our ‘thinking’ is who we really are. Of course, nothing could be further from the truth. This is where the practice of Meditation, or any meaningful method of quieting the mind, can serve as a profound way to reengage with our Higher Selves. For those who struggle with separating themselves from their internal dialogue, I’ve found this simple Toltec observation to be an eye opener- ‘If you are your thinking… who’s listening?’

Alan Watts – Give it away and it will come back

An important message that will ring true too many people, spoken by the late philosopher Alan Watts.

Audio Courtesy of: alanwatts.org

“We seldom realize, for example that our most private thoughts and emotions are not actually our own. For we think in terms of languages and images which we did not invent, but which were given to us by our society.”… “We could say that meditation doesn’t have a reason or doesn’t have a purpose. In this respect it’s unlike almost all other things we do except perhaps making music and dancing. When we make music we don’t do it in order to reach a certain point, such as the end of the composition. If that were the purpose of music then obviously the fastest players would be the best. Also, when we are dancing we are not aiming to arrive at a particular place on the floor as in a journey. When we dance, the journey itself is the point, as when we play music the playing itself is the point. And exactly the same thing is true in meditation. Meditation is the discovery that the point of life is always arrived at in the immediate moment.” ~Alan Watts

“You have seen that the universe is at root a magical illusion and a fabulous game, and that there is no separate “you” to get something out of it, as if life were a bank to be robbed. The only real “you” is the one that comes and goes, manifests and withdraws itself eternally in and as every conscious being. For “you” is the universe looking at itself from billions of points of view, points that come and go so that the vision is forever new.” ~Alan Watts

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From Wikipedia:

Alan Wilson Watts (6 January 1915 – 16 November 1973) was a British-born philosopher, writer, and speaker, best known as an interpreter and populariser of Eastern philosophy for a Western audience. Born in Chislehurst, he moved to the United States in 1938 and began Zen training in New York. Pursuing a career, he attended Seabury-Western Theological Seminary, where he received a master’s degree in theology. Watts became an Episcopal priest then left the ministry in 1950 and moved to California, where he joined the faculty of the American Academy of Asian Studies.

Watts gained a large following in the San Francisco Bay Area while working as a volunteer programmer at KPFA, a Pacifica Radio station in Berkeley. Watts wrote more than 25 books and articles on subjects important to Eastern and Western religion, introducing the then-burgeoning youth culture to The Way of Zen (1957), one of the first bestselling books on Buddhism. In Psychotherapy East and West (1961), Watts proposed that Buddhism could be thought of as a form of psychotherapy and not a religion. He also explored human consciousness, in the essay “The New Alchemy” (1958), and in the book The Joyous Cosmology (1962).

Towards the end of his life, he divided his time between a houseboat in Sausalito and a cabin on Mount Tamalpais. His legacy has been kept alive by his son, Mark Watts, and many of his recorded talks and lectures are available on the Internet. According to the critic Erik Davis, his “writings and recorded talks still shimmer with a profound and galvanizing lucidity.”

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